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Landing on the front wheel


Landing on the front wheel is really a sophisticated approach to big gaps or another trick to save your energy on small transitions. Well performed, landing to front wheel is smoother than the typical pedal hop, offering more control and fluidity upon landing. It does not require as much pedal power as trying to land directly on the rear wheel. The weight transfer sequence is a bit like in the roll-up climbing technique, without the pedalling approach.

Step-by-step

trials riding tutorials No way back for Andrei Burton.

From a standing position, balance over the rear wheel at about a foot from the edge of the gap. Lower the front wheel slightly and crouch back behind the handlebars to get extra torque. This compresses the rear tyre on the edge before the pedal kick. Pull yourself on the bars and spring into extension, thrusting your hips and shoulders forward while standing on your front pedal before the kick.

trials riding tutorials Vincent Hermance in mid-air.

Only release the rear brake to finish up your jump impulse with a strong pedal kick. This firm quarter crank turn propels you off the edge, synchronized with the rebound effect of the rear tyre. The full extension should bring your shoulders over the handlebars, with your abdomen right over the stem.

After take-off, rather than pulling the bike up in front of you to lift the rear wheel, you should actively aim the front wheel at the other side of the gap.

trials riding tutorials Kenny Belaey leans forward to aim the front wheel.


In effect, the bike is used as a tilting bridge. Extend your arms and push on the handlebars to force the front wheel to touch down as soon as possible. As the front tyre touches down, feather the front brake to slow down the bike but keep enough momentum forward to carry-on rolling on the front wheel until the rear wheel has reached the obstacle.

You can rely more or less on the front brake depending on the distance and your initial momentum. If you lock the front wheel upon landing, flex your arms and legs to bring your centre of gravity over the front wheel, away from the gap, before performing a clean front-to-back wheel-swap.


Click on any step below and use the scroll-wheel to move through the animation.

Crossing gap to front wheel

trials riding tutorials
1° Lower the front wheel slightly and crouch back behind the handlebars to get extra torque. This compresses the rear tyre on the edge.

trials riding tutorials
2° Pull yourself on the bars and spring into extension, thrusting your hips and shoulders forward while standing on your front pedal.

trials riding tutorials
3° Only release the rear brake to finish up your jump impulse with a strong pedal kick. This firm quarter crank turn propels you off the edge.

trials riding tutorials
4° Use the bike as a tilting bridge, extend your arms and push on the handlebars to force the front wheel to touch down as soon as possible.

trials riding tutorials
5° Feather the front brake to slow down the bike but keep enough momentum forward to carry-on rolling on the front wheel.

trials riding tutorials
6° You can play more or less with the front brake and your initial momentum, until your rear wheel reaches the obstacle.


Biketrial video Watch all the slow-motion video clips for this move Biketrial video


Tilting the bike down

trials riding tutorials Nicolas Vuillermot touching down.

trials riding tutorials Hannes Herrmann pushes the bike in front of himself.

At the beginning, it feels a bit odd to force the front wheel down just after a jump impulse. Practise on a flat surface first, with two lines as a virtual gap, then you may climb up on a very small kerb as your visual target. Focus on your forward thrust while actively aiming the front wheel at a landing spot. Release the front brake progressively as you land to let the bike roll on the front wheel while maintaining the rear wheel up.

Vary the pressure on the brake until you get this right. If there is enough room for the full bike's length on the other side of the gap, then there is no need to block the front wheel abruptly. It will be smoother to carry on the move with just the right amount of momentum in one fluid transition of your centre of gravity.

Missing the edge on the other side of the gap can result in a scary face-plant. If that happens but the tyre is stopped on the edge, keep the front brake completely locked to secure maximum control as you bail out (as long as the front wheel is stopped, you can eject yourself out of danger).


Turning on your front foot side
It is usually easier to land on the front wheel if you take-off at a slight angle, about 20 degrees from the straight line, turning on your front foot side as you pull the bike forward.

With your front foot facing the gap, it will be easier to tilt the bike vertically on the side you kick, because your body weight is mainly distributed over your strong foot and it will be easier to turn the bike around that foot, along the axis of your leg. These little subtleties will allow you to deliver the kick at full power while allowing the bike movement to compensate naturally for the asymmetric load.


Landing on a narrow spot

trials riding tutorials Benito Ros about to secure the front wheel.

trials riding tutorials Rick Koekoek performs a wheel-swap.

If you have to land on a small area with no room for both wheels to rest, your only option is to keep your momentum and transfer all your weight over the front hub before a perfect wheel-swap. Upon landing, you should flex both your arms and legs to bring your centre of gravity well over the front wheel, then release the front brake in one go with a firm scooping motion upwards to tilt the bike up directly to rear wheel.


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